Is MPPT safe?

The components of MPPT are approved food supplements without any known cytotoxicity. MPPT has been shown to cause no wound irritation, sensitisation or bleeding. MPPT is not absorbed by the body and can be rinsed off by irrigation with water or wiped off with a moist swab. It…

Can MPPT harm the wound bed?

MPPT sucks the exudate fluid away from the wound surface by means of capillary forces. Capillary forces automatically stop the sucking action as soon as there is no longer any excess fluid present because air will enter the system and break the continuous water column. Consequently, the suction…

How should I store MPPT?

MPPT should be stored refrigerated between 2 and 10 degrees C. MPPt can comfortably be handled at room temperature. However, it is important to shield it from direct heat sources. Examples are direct sunlight, radiators, window sills, pockets near to the body etc.

Can I leave the wound uncovered?

Yes. just make sure the entire wound area and the edges are well covered with MPPT. There is no need to apply excess product as it will only fall off. A few more applications may be needed as the MPPT layer is at risk of being worn away.…

What secondary dressing (bandage) is recommended?

The secondary dressing to cover and hold the MPPT layer in place should be light, dry and highly permeable. This allows the wound exudate to evaporate and the wound to breathe, as is the intention, as MPPT effectively facilitates the evaporation of the wound exudate. Two alternatives: Swab…

Can I use antiseptics when preparing the wound?

The use of antiseptics is discouraged when preparing the wound for MPPT application. We strongly advise against the use of antiseptics that are cytotoxic to human cells and that accumulate in the tissue, e.g. Chlorhexidine. About Chlorhexidine If for a specific reason it is necessary to use an…

How do I recognise whether the wound is “clean”?

A clean wound has no cloudy exudate, pus, slough, maceration or biofilm. Simultaneously, in MPPT wounds, granulation tissue will often be noticeable in the wound bed as red buttons and signs of epithelial tissue (new skin cells) may in many cases be present as white healthy sections of…

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