How antiseptics and disinfectants make you resistant to antibiotics.

It has always been assumed that antimicrobial resistance would only develop in response to the use of antibiotics, but newer data suggest that antiseptics, disinfectants and other antibacterial approaches are even worse at creating resistance. Data namely indicate that these chemicals cause the bacteria to become tolerant or resistant not only to a specific antiseptic or disinfectant,…

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How often should I change the bandage, i.e. apply MPPT?

MPPT should be applied once daily until the wound is clean, i.e. when the wound exudate is no longer cloudy and the wound is free of slough, pus, maceration and biofilm. Intervals up to 2-4 days between dressing changes have been used successfully. It may, however, prolong the time required to reach a clean wound compared to…

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How do I use MPPT?

Please see refer to Instructions for Use for a complete description. A quick overview: Clean the wound using saline or tap water. Use a lint free swab to help remove any undesired matter. Gently dry the wound dabbing it using a dry lint-free swab or lukewarm air-dryer. Sprinkle on MPPT in an even layer of 1-3mm covering…

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Does Acapsil contribute to the creation of antibiotic resistant bacterial strains?

No. MPPT is not an antibiotic and it does not have any direct antimicrobial action – it does not kill the bacteria. Bacteria have two main defence mechanisms by which they fight off the body’s immune cells: Toxins and biofilm. MPPT removes the toxins when it absorbs the exudate thereby preventing these from attacking the immune cells;…

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Can wounds with antibiotic resistant infections benefit from MPPT?

Yes. MPPT has assisted in clearing up antibiotic resistant infections. MPPT is not an antibiotic but instead allows the body’s own immune system access to the bacteria enabling the immune cells to fight back via many different routes. MPPT will not contribute to the creation of antibiotic resistance.

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After discontinuing the use of MPPT, how should I care for the wound?

MPPT is discontinued when the wound has entered the regenerative wound healing phase. The wound should now preferably be covered with a permeable, atraumatic, open-weave, contact layer dressing and a few-ply gauze on top. This protects the regenerating wound bed while still allowing the wound to breathe. An example of a suitable contact layer dressing is N-A…

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Does MPPT work in conjunction with other topical products, i.e. applied directly to the wound?

No. Any other therapies or treatments applied directly to the wound surface may impact the pumping capacity of MPPT and should be avoided. Examples of topical therapies to avoid: all hydro-gels, collagen (powder, cream and dressing), occlusive absorbent dressings (e.g. alginates), honey, silver, topical negative pressure therapy, and topical antibiotics (ointment, cream, paste and powder). Some dressings…

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