How should the wound be cleaned before the first MPPT application?

In general, water is the best medium for wound cleaning. It removes large parts of slough and hence undesirable microbes effectively; in particular if it is applied with the pressure that can be achieved by using a wash-bottle or a large syringe. If a large contusion zone or extensive amounts of slough are present in the wound…

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Water is preferable for wound cleaning… but – Why can hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) be useful in some cases?

It is to be recognised that some wounds have a contusion zone consisting of tissue balancing on the edge between being viable (being able to live) and unviable and therefore destined to die off sooner or later. It is preferable to get rid of the unviable tissue as early in the wound healing process as possible as…

Continue Reading Water is preferable for wound cleaning… but – Why can hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) be useful in some cases?
What is debridement? And what types of debridement exist?

Debridement is the process of removal of non-viable tissue (necrosis) and foreign material, e.g. sand, from a wound to expose healthy tissue. A wound containing necrotic tissue cannot heal. Necrotic tissue provides an ideal growth medium for bacteria.   There are five major techniques of debridement: Autolytic debridement: Supporting the body’s own immune system to dissolve and…

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How does MPPT work (MoA)?

MPPT works in three steps: Absorption, Pumping by capillary forces and Evaporation. The Exudate is absorbed into the MPPT micropore particles. These are highly porous and the pores (or capillaries) are interconnected. The capillaries work as a battery of small individual pumps that by means of capillary forces suck ( pumps) the exudate to the surface of…

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Does MPPT work on an infected and/or a necrotic wound?

Yes. Procedure: If the wound contains infection and/or necrosis, remove as much pus and slough as possible using water and a moist swab. If the use of an antiseptic is necessary, 3% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is preferable. The use of H2O2 is contraindicated in very deep or large wounds due to risk of gas embolism. Alternatively, use…

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Can MPPT benefit acute and chronic wounds, e.g. post-surgical wounds, trauma wounds and burns?

Yes, MPPT can benefit all types of non-sterile wounds that are to close by secondary or tertiary intention; in other words any wound that cannot be sutured or needs to clear up and start granulating before suturing can be assisted by MPPT. MPPT can be used on low to highly exuding wounds, as well as wounds with…

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