Pollution – Plastics, Antimicrobials & Chemicals

Currently, there are 278 million annual wound dressing changes in UK primary care. Most dressing changes include the use of wound cleaning solutions and dressings, which for infected wounds frequently contain chemical antimicrobials such as e.g. polyaminopropyl biguanide aka polyhexamethylene biguanide aka PHMB aka polyhexanide aka polihexanide, chlorhexidine,…

Comparative Clinical Study of MPPT, Antibiotic and Antiseptic

See publication in WOUNDS here. Objective The purpose of the study was to evaluate the wound healing effects of MPPT and to compare it to antibiotics and antiseptics. The study included a wide range of wounds and ulcers, which were severely colonised to infected. The comparators were a…

AMR – Antimicrobial Resistance

The UN predicts that antibiotic-resistant infections could kill 10 million people globally by 2050. Former chancellor, George Osborne in 2016 warned that apart from the consequences for human health, there will be an ‘enormous economic cost’ predicting a global reduction in GDP up to 3.5 per cent –…

How antiseptics and disinfectants make you resistant to antibiotics.

It has always been assumed that antimicrobial resistance would only develop in response to the use of antibiotics, but newer data suggest that antiseptics, disinfectants and other antibacterial approaches are even worse at creating resistance. Data namely indicate that these chemicals cause the bacteria to become tolerant or…

Chair of the WHO Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) group

Publication shows that MPPT acts as a passive immunotherapy that interacts with the microbiome and calls for a paradigm shift in the treatment of wounds and ulcers (Sams-Dodd et al. 2018). In response to these findings, Executive Board member of the World Health Organization (WHO), and chair of…

End of content

No more pages to load