MPPT treatment of wounds and pressure ulcers in spinal cord injured patients

A prospective study in adult spinal cord injury (SCI) persons was conducted to determine the efficacy and safety of MPPT (micropore particle technology – Amicapsil) for the treatment of wounds below the site of injury. SCI-persons have an immune deficiency syndrome due to the disruption of communication between…

Comparative Clinical Study of MPPT, Antibiotic and Antiseptic

See publication in WOUNDS here. Objective The purpose of the study was to evaluate the wound healing effects of MPPT and to compare it to antibiotics and antiseptics. The study included a wide range of wounds and ulcers, which were severely colonised to infected. The comparators were a…

Why should Chlorhexidine not be used before the application of MPPT?

Chlorhexidine binds strongly to the skin and tissues. Chlorhexidine is cytotoxic to fibroblasts which are the creators of the connective tissue essential to wound healing. It is toxic to human tissue cells at the same concentrations it is toxic to bacteria. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3238890 Chlorhexidine’s activity lasts at least 48…

Is MPPT safe?

The components of MPPT are approved food supplements without any known cytotoxicity. MPPT has been shown to cause no wound irritation, sensitisation or bleeding. MPPT is not absorbed by the body and can be rinsed off by irrigation with water or wiped off with a moist swab. It…

Can MPPT harm the wound bed?

MPPT sucks the exudate fluid away from the wound surface by means of capillary forces. Capillary forces automatically stop the sucking action as soon as there is no longer any excess fluid present because air will enter the system and break the continuous water column. Consequently, the suction…

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